Six on Saturday 04.01.20

This weeks’s SoS post is coming to you from The Coromandel, and is a bit of a cheat post, with a bit about the plants at home at the end of 2019 and the a little something about what surrounds us where we are staying. It is also my first post of 2020 and written with great difficulty on my iPad! Thanks once again to The Propagator for letting us share our plants and gardens, and those we have visited.

At home, the nasturtiums were still looking magnificent at the turn of the year. I’ve also had time for tidying and weeding, being on holiday.

The weather has been mixed, but we have had some glorious days too as you can see below.

Summer

We are on holiday up in The Coromandel just now, staying in an idyllic spot up on the hills, Tranquility Hill. The road up to where we are staying is full of striking hydrangeas, mostly blue, but a few pink as well. They are magnificent and form a beautiful welcome to the property.

Hydrangeas
The path up to the house

There is a bush at the bottom of the hill with these striking pink flowers that look very like a lily magnolia – similar height too – but surely the wrong season?

Are they magnolia?

At number 5, more views of where we are staying. A bit exposed to the wind, but still an amazing view.

The gardens
Gardens, hills and water feature

Finally, I cannot express my thoughts and feelings about the fires in Australia. The footage we see and news we hear is so horrific. Dust has been blown over to us here in New Zealand, something hard to comprehend somehow. I can only hope that the weather changes and rain falls. There really are no words that seem appropriate.

As usual, I am looking forward to seeing everyone’s beautiful gardens in other parts of the world. All the very best for your gardening exploits in 2020. 

You can find Thistles and Kiwis on Facebook, and also on Instagram@thistleandkiwis.  As for Twitter….am totally inactive these days.  If you want to get in touch, email me on thistlesandkiwis@gmail.com

26 Comments

  1. Lovely hydrangea walk. Mine all grow pink. There is one smaller one in my garden I’ve decided to feed over this year to see if I can change it to blue or towards purple for a bit of variety.
    Think everyone is hoping for rain down in Australia. Amazing, but worrying that the dust is drifting to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. One thing I found very odd in New Zealand was how many of the tree dotted about the landscape, looking like they were natural, were actually introduced. Made me wonder what the trees were in the “gardens, hills and water feature” picture. On the other hand both hydrangea pics have what look like natural regeneration young kauri trees in them, which is great. The magnolia will be either a form of M. liliflora or a hybrid with it; they flower a bit later and go on a long time.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I can see that you still have a blue sky so far … or almost … the news has told us that New Zealand has had a sky filled with smoke from Australia in recent days. It’s terrible what’s going on there … so much mess … quick rain over there !
    About your Six, I love these hydrangeas!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That looks like a fabulous place for a holiday. And the hydrangeas bring back memories of summer. The season’s pass all too quickly it seems (except winter which likes to linger…)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. What a place to vacation at! The view of gardens, hills, water feature looks to be one that would make everything inside you relax. Love that magnolia, & your nasturtiums aren’t bad either. Great colour.

    Like

  6. What a wonderful SoS. Great to have a blog entry from New Zealand, looks amazing. I’m with you about the horrendous fires in Australia. A gardening friend has a grandson there until recently and she was so worried about his well being. All turned out well of course.

    Looking forward to more of your blog postings.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Tranquility Hill is aptly named. The hydrangeas along the road remind me that I often don’t use waves of plantings nearly enough. I should. It is good for the eye and good for pollinators.

    Liked by 1 person

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